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Schwabe Bolsters Bioscience, Intellectual Property Practices

October 26, 2010

Overview

Regional law firm Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt recently expanded its intellectual property, bioscience and business groups with the addition of Frank X. Curci as a shareholder. Curci is an intellectual property and technology attorney who represents clients in the bioscience and high technology industries.

"Frank is a well-respected intellectual property attorney with a recognized reputation in several cutting-edge areas of the bioscience and high technology industries," said Mark Long, managing partner at Schwabe. "His expertise will greatly augment Schwabe's intellectual property practice and the firm's representation of our clients in the bioscience and high technology industries."

Curci's clients include biotech research institutions, universities, technology incubators, and other private sector companies in the high technology and bioscience industries. He represents these entities in a wide range of domestic and international intellectual property, research, technology collaboration, and other technology law matters.

Curci has obtained a strong reputation representing biotech research institutions, universities, and bioscience companies concerning research collaborations, patent licensing, other research issues, and other technology commercialization matters.

Curci has also earned a national reputation representing technology companies in their participation in technology standards initiatives and other multi-party technology collaborations and consortia.

"Frank's bioscience background will be particularly valuable to the firm in serving the growing biotechnology industries in both Oregon and Washington," said Long. "Additionally, we are very excited to be adding such an experienced attorney as Frank to Schwabe's technology consortia practice, which has already been established as one of the nation's leading practices in that niche technology area."

Curci comes to Schwabe upon returning to Portland from Phoenix, Ariz., where he practiced law for more than five years with the Arizona-based law firm of Jennings Strouss & Salmon. Curci was the chair of Jenning Strouss & Salmon's biotechnology/life sciences and intellectual property practices. During Curci's more than five years in Arizona he was very active in Arizona's bioscience industry, including serving on the board of directors of the Arizona BioIndustry Association.

Prior to his time in Phoenix, Curci practiced law in Portland, Ore., for more than 17 years, most recently at Preston Gates & Ellis where he was the lead partner of its IP practice in Portland. While with Preston Gates & Ellis, his practice focused on intellectual property and technology law matters for technology-based companies of various sizes and universities.

As a result of his experience, Curci has been recognized as one of The Best Lawyers in America® 2009-2011 in both the Biotechnology Law and Technology Law fields.

Since 1996, Curci has been an Adjunct Professor of Law teaching intellectual property law courses at Oregon, Arizona and California law schools. He regularly lectures and writes on intellectual property and technology topics relevant to the bioscience and high technology industries.

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